In December 2015, the met office of the UK had already predicted 2016 to be warmer than all previous years.

Similarly NOAA and NASA also claimed 2016 as one of the hottest years in the record after observing climate extremities in February. The same was reiterated by WMO – World Meteorological organization in July after observing 14 consecutive record breaking months.

As we stepped into 2017 with the statistics of 2016, it became evident that 2016 was 1.1°C warmer than previous year’s average across the world. With the El Nino effects, meteorologists agree that the major reason behind this rising temperature was the frequent climate change issue.

NSW summer faces severe consequences of climate change

Researchers believe that the main cause of record average temperatures and heat wave in NSW was the strong climate change, besetting eastern states of Australia in the last summer season.

Culminating the epic days of February 11 – 12th, repeated heat waves have already broken extreme temperature records along with pushing the mercury 45°C beyond in various areas of the state. A devastating fire and extreme temperatures consumed entire villages and perished wildlife from simple exposure to extreme heat.

As per different research models and analysis;

“It is evident that average summer temperatures like those seen during 2016-2017 are now at least 50 times more likely in the current climate than in the past, before global warming began.”

In extension to that, scientists stated:

“The heat seen this past summer across parts of Australia is still rare in our current climate. However, if greenhouse gas emissions are not dramatically reduced, intense summer heat will become the norm in the future,”

At the local level, the climate change signals are still there. Analyzing the extreme temperature that struck Australia’s city Canberra shows that these weather calamities have almost 50% more possibility of occurring in 2017 than it was previously expected in 2016.

“We see that average summer temperatures like those seen during 2016-2017 are now at least 50 times more likely in the current climate than in the past, before global warming began,” say researchers in a report.

The highest temperature in a single day has also been observed in more likely proportions – by a factor of 10. Previously these temperatures were expected to occur once in 500 years, these calamities are more common now and are observed every 50 years.

As per Geert Jan Van Oldenburg – working on the research presented by Meteorological Bureau of the Netherlands;

“We are moving towards a situation that these kind of attribution studies are not peer-reviewed themselves but based on peer-reviewed methods. Just like a seasonal forecast, or indeed a weather forecast. If the situation has novel aspects we tend to write a scientific article about it afterwards, but I do not think that this one qualifies given the amount of work that has already been published on heat waves and warm seasons in Australia,”

As we see Australia and other countries being badly affected by these climatic changes, there is a dire need for appropriate measures to be taken collaboratively across the world – preventing further consequences.

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